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Education Quarterly Reviews

ISSN 2621-5799

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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Published: 26 July 2021

A Perspective on the Flipped Learning Pedagogy in Thai Undergraduate Education

Kevin Fuchs

Prince of Songkla University, Thailand

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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doi

10.31014/aior.1993.04.03.324

Pages: 127-131

Keywords: Flipped Classroom, Inverted Learning, Higher Education, Thailand, Active Learning

Abstract

The world is changing at a much faster pace than in the past and has become more connected than ever before. This has led to increasing levels of economic competition and socio-political-cultural transformation. The necessity for Thailand to compete internationally is based on the creation of quality graduates. The rapid changes in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) are transforming the ways people think, live, learn, and interact. These rapid changes have implications in all spheres of national development and higher education learning. For Thailand to remain competitive in an age of global movement and uncertainty, a knowledge-based society, i.e., a society that generates innovations through creativity and shared and utilized knowledge, must be developed. The flipped classroom approach has a recognized record of delivering the active learning pedagogy to the modern classroom. This practitioners’ perspective provides further insights into why Thailand’s higher education system would benefit from adapting to this innovative active learning pedagogy.

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