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Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Education Quarterly Reviews

ISSN 2621-5799

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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Published: 12 April 2021

Bringing ICT into the Classroom: Perceptions from Tourism Students on Technology-Enhanced Learning

Kevin Fuchs

Prince of Songkla University, Thailand

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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doi

10.31014/aior.1993.04.02.203

Pages: 115-121

Keywords: Technology-Enhanced Learning, Connectivism, Active Learning

Abstract

The advancement of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can be seen as a blessing in disguise. On one hand, digital information is readily available nowadays, which in turn makes the hardwiring of knowledge less significant and shifts the focus towards competency development. In a digitalized world where information is easily accessible, it is argued that students in higher education need to develop more sensible soft skills that allow them to systematically and critically analyze information. Whilst knowledge can be acquired in a relatively short period, competency development requires more active repetition and patience. Thus, applying relevant and supportive teaching methods is seen as essential. Quantitative data was collected from the participants (n=107) and examined through descriptive analysis. The results of the research revealed that students in higher education generally had a positive perception of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) and considered themselves proficient with the usage of ICT in the classroom. Based on the empirical findings from this paper, a qualitative study was recommended to identify how ICT can be more effectively integrated into the traditional classroom.

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