Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute
Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Education Quarterly Reviews

ISSN 2621-5799

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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Published: 30 April 2021

Teaching Note-Taking Skills to Students with Learning Disabilities: CUES+CC Strategy

Alpaslan Karabulut, Büşra Baran

Bolu Abant İzzet Baysal University (Turkey), Özel Özden Özeleğitim (Turkey)

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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doi

10.31014/aior.1993.04.02.265

Pages: 542-555

Keywords: Learning Disabilities, CUESS+CC Strategy, Middle School, Note-Taking, Cognitive Strategy, Self-Regulated Strategies Development

Abstract

The main purpose of this research is to examine the effectiveness of the CUES+CC strategy in improving the note-taking performance of students with learning disabilities. Within the scope of this purpose, the effect of the CUES+CC strategy on students’ note-taking and exam performances and maintenance of the performance was investigated. Moreover, the students’ level of generalizing of their note-taking performance to Turkish lesson was also examined. Three students who were diagnosed with learning disabilities in the study. ‘Multiple Probe Design Across Subjects,’ one of the single subject designs, was used in this study. The students’ note-taking percentages and exam performance were used to score the data. The findings revealed that the CUES+CC strategy is effective on note-taking and exam performance of students with disabilities and upon learning the strategy, the students displayed the same improved performance on note-taking after one, three, and five weeks, and they extended this performance to a different course as well. The findings of the research were discussed within the framework of the relevant literature and theoretical opinions, and suggestions were made to researchers working in the field for future research.

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