Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute
Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Education Quarterly Reviews

ISSN 2621-5799

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
crossref
doi
open access

Published: 27 August 2021

Tracing Cultural Values in Thai Students’ Dialogical Argumentation

Tanyapon Phongphio

Chiang Mai University, Thailand

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
pdf download

Download Full-Text Pdf

doi

10.31014/aior.1993.04.03.341

Pages: 322-333

Keywords: Argumentation Skills, Reasoning, Thinking Skills

Abstract

Critical thinking and argumentation skills are crucial for developing responsible citizens and active participants in society. Indeed, reasoning and argumentation are known to be exercised differently in distinctive cultures. Historical, cultural and institutional contexts shape the way people in a society think, communicate and act. In this regard, the predominant Western assumption that reasoning should be detachable from emotion may not necessarily be accurate within the Thai cultural context. This paper highlights how different cultural assumptions were displayed in dialogical argumentation in English for fourteen, first-year undergraduates of the English Programme at a Thai university. The analysis of the argumentation data indicated that some participants presented their claims close to the end of their argumentative turns. In addition, personal experience was regularly employed as an argumentative strategy. Interestingly, there was also an absence of claims in some argumentative turns. The aforementioned findings and the themes derived from an analysis of the semi-structured interview data reflect some specific characteristics of Thai culture and values. They include indirectness and a desire for harmony, a subjectivity in argumentation and modesty.

References

  1. Billig, M. (1996). Arguing and Thinking: A Rhetorical Approach to Social Psychology(2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  2. Boss. (2015). Think: Critical Thinking and Logic Skills for Everyday Life (3rd ed.). McGraw-Hill Education.

  3. Bruner, J. S. (1996). The Culture of Education. London: Havard University Press.

  4. Cassaniti, J., & Luhrmann, T. M. (2011). Encountering the Supernatural: A Phenomenological Account of Mind. Religion and Society: Advances in Research, 2(1), 37–53. https://doi.org/10.3167/arrs.2011.020103

  5. Daniels, H. (2001). Vygotsky and Pedagogy. London: Routledge.

  6. de Silva, P. (2006). The Psychology of Emotions in Buddhist Perspective. The Wheel Publication No. 237. Kandy: Buddhist Publication Society.

  7. Doise, W., & Mugny, G. (1984). The Social Develoment of the Intellect. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

  8. Eemeren, F. H. van, & Grootendorst, R. (2004). A Systematic Theory of Argumentation: The Pragma-Dialectical Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  9. Eemeren, F. H. van, Grootendorst, R., Henkemans, F. S., Blaire, J. A., Johnson, R. H., Erik, C. W. K., … Zarefsky, D. (1996). Fundamentals of Argumentation Theory: A Handbook of Historical Backgrounds and Contemporary Developments. Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum.

  10. Fiske, A. P., Kitayama, S., Markus, H. R., & Nisbett, R. E. (1998). The Cultural Matrix of Social Psychology. In D. Gilbert, A. Fiske, & G. Lindzey (Eds.), Handbook of Social Psychology (pp. 915–981). New York: McGraw-Hill.

  11. Gross, R. M. (2014). The Suffering of Sexism: Buddhist Perspectives and Experiences. Buddhist-Christian Studies, 34(1), 69–81. https://doi.org/10.1353/bcs.2014.0015

  12. Gyamtso, K. T. (2010). The Path of Faith and the Path of Reasoning. Retrieved June 2, 2021, from https://tricycle.org/magazine/path-faith-and-path-reasoning/

  13. Kahneman, D. (2003). A Perspective on Judgment and Choice: Mapping Bounded Rationality. American Psychologist, 58(9), 697–720. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.58.9.697

  14. Mackenzie, C. (2014). Three Dimensions of Autonomy: A Relational Analysis. In A. Veltman & M. Pipe (Eds.), Autonomy, Oppression, and Gender (pp. 15–41). Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199969104.001.0001

  15. Malikhao, P. (2017). Culture and Commuication in Thailand: Communication, Culture and Change in Asia 3. (J. Servaes, Ed.). Hong Kong: Springer.

  16. Markus, H. R., & Kitayama, S. (1991). Culture of the Self: Implications for Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation. Psychological Review, 98(2), 224–253.

  17. Markus, H. R., Kitayama, S., & Heiman, R. J. (1996). Culture and “Basic” Psychological Principles. In E. T. Higgins & A. W. Kruglanski (Eds.), Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles1 (pp. 857–913). New York: Guilford Press.

  18. Matsumoto, D. (1990). Cultural Similarities and Differences in Display Rules. Motivation and Emotion, 14(3), 195–214. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00995569

  19. Matsumoto, D., Consolacion, T., Yamada, H., Suzuki, R., Franklin, B., Paul, S., … Uchida, H. (2002). American-Japanese Cultural Differences in Judgements of Emotional Expressions of Different Intensities. Cognition and Emotion, 16(6), 721–747. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699930143000608

  20. Mercier, H., & Sperber, D. (2011). Why do Humans Reason? Arguments for an Argumentative Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 34(02), 57–111. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X10000968

  21. Mulder, N. (2000). Inside Thai Society: Religion, Everyday Life, Change. Chiang Mai: Silkworm Books.

  22. National Statistical Office. (2011). Survey of Social and Cultural Conditions 2011. Retrieved January 20, 2018, from http://service.nso.go.th/nso/nsopublish/themes/files/soc-culPocket.pdf

  23. Nisbett, R. E. (2003). The Geography of Thought: How Asian and Westerners Think Differently...and Why. New York: The Free Press.

  24. Office of the Education Council. (2017). National Qualifications Framework (Thailand NQF) (Revised ed). Bangkok: Office of the Education Council, Ministry of Education.

  25. Partnership for 21st Century learning. (2009). P21 Framework Definitions. Retrieved September 9, 2019, from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED519462.pdf

  26. Phrachonyanmuni, & Wongsaard, S. (2020). Buddhism and Belief. Journal of Palisueksabuddhaghosa, 6(2), 99–115. Retrieved from https://so05.tci-thaijo.org

  27. Quellmalz, E. S. (1987). Developing Reasoning Skills. In J. B. Baron & R. J. Sternberg (Eds.), Teaching Thinking Skills: Theory and Practice (pp. 86–105). New York: W. H. Freeman and Company.

  28. Royal Thai Embassy, W. D. C. (n.d.). Thailand 4.0. Retrieved January 26, 2021, from https://thaiembdc.org/thailand-4-0-2/

  29. Sattayanurak, S. (2002). Intellectuals and the Establishment of Identities in the Thai Absolute Monarchy State. Journal of the Siam Society, 2(90.1 &2), 101–124. Retrieved from http://www.siamese-heritage.org/jsspdf/2001/JSS_090_0g_SaicholSattayanurak_IntellectualsAndIdentities.pdf

  30. Sattayanurak, S. (2005). The Construction of Mainstream Thought on “Thainess” and the “Truth” Constructed by “Thainess.” In 2nd Humanity Research Conference: New Dimension of Interdisciplinary and Integration Humanity Research. 10-11 August 2005, Chiangmai, Thailand. Retrieved from http://thaimissions.info/gsdl/collect/thaimiss/index/assoc/HASH0182/3bba5980.dir/doc.pdf

  31. Sperber, D. (2001). An Evalutionary Perspective on Testimony and Argumentation. Philosophical Topics, 29(1 & 2), 401–413.

  32. Swati, M. F., & Ghani-ur-Rahman. (2012). Assassination Attempts on the Buddha as Depicted in the Gandharan Reliefs. Journal of Asian Civilizations, 35(1), 65–75. Retrieved from https://www.proquest.com/openview/a64ac9005312e1e0c114417641cd4993/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=105703

  33. Tappolet, C. (2014). Emotions, Reasons, and Autonomy. In A. Veltman & M. Pipe (Eds.), Autonomy, Oppression, and Gender (pp. 163–180). Oxford: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199969104.001.0001

  34. Toulmin, S. (1976). Knowing & Acting: An Invitation to Philosophy. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc.

  35. Wattanagun, K. (2018). The Phenomenology of Supernatural Belief. Asian Ethonology, 77, 79–98. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/26604834

  36. Weigand, E. (2004). Emotions: The Simple and the Complex. In E. Weigand (Ed.), Emotion in Dialogic Interaction: Advances in the Complex. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

  37. Xu, X., Kerley, K. R., & Sirisunyaluck, B. (2011). Understanding Gender and Domestic Violence from a Sample of Married Women in Urban Thailand. Journal of Family Issues, 32(6), 791–819. https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X10386306

  38. Zhang, R. (2018). Critical Thinking and Buddhism. Outstanding Gateway Papers, 16. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.iwu.edu/gateway/16

  39. Zohar, S. (2013). Influence of Cultural Values on Emotion Regulation and Well-Being: A Study of Thai University Students. Scholar: Human Science, 5(1), 83–91. Retrieved from http://www.assumptionjournal.au.edu/index.php/Scholar/article/view/164

  40. ปัญญาภา, ร. (2014). Potential of Wisdom in Buddhism: Principal Concept for Educational Administration. วารสารครุศาสตร์ปริทรรศน์ฯ, 1(1), 27-42. Retrieved from https://so02.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/EDMCU/article/view/142737