Hypertension a Cause and Concern for Various Cardiovascular Diseases in Male and Female Population

Journal of Health and Medical Sciences

ISSN 2622-7258

Published: 15 February 2019

Hypertension a Cause and Concern for Various Cardiovascular Diseases in Male and Female Population

Raisa Nazir Ahmed Kazi, Sudha Anbalagan, Shaheena Tabassum Ahsan

Prince Sattam Bin Abdul-Aziz University, Saudi Arabia

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10.31014/aior.1994.02.01.16

Abstract

Hypertension is the leading cause for the onset of many cardiovascular diseases and a predominant health care burden in Arab countries. Increased prevalence of hypertension is observed in obese teens, and adult population increases the risk for many cardiovascular diseases, renal functional derangement, and cerebral stroke. The present study aims to find out the prevalence of hypertension among male and female populations in the Wadi Aldawasir region of Saudi Arabia. Data were collected from the medical record for the patient visiting Wadi Aldawasir general hospital during the period of 2014-2018. Off the total of 347 male and female populations, 234 were diagnosed with hypertension that accounts for 67 percentages. Among, 347 total patients, 137 were female, and 97 were male. The result of the study showed that the prevalence of hypertension was higher among both male and female adult. However, the incidence of hypertension was more in female compared to male. Considering the observed prevalence of hypertension in both male and female population and because of the subsequent outcomes of hypertension on the cardiovascular functioning, therapeutic intervention, and effective community-based health care programs in educating the people about the risk factors of hypertension is required in this region of Saudi Arabia.

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