Smoking, Wellbeing and Academic Attainment

Journal of Health and Medical Sciences

ISSN 2622-7258

Published: 26 July 2019

Smoking, Wellbeing and Academic Attainment

Andrew P. Smith

Cardiff University

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10.31014/aior.1994.02.03.48

Pages: 279-284

Keywords: Smoking, Wellbeing, Academic Attainment

Abstract

The research described here examined associations between smoking, wellbeing and academic attainment of university students. Wellbeing was investigated using the Student Wellbeing Process Questionnaire (WPQ) and academic attainment was assessed using Grade Point Average (GPA) and perceptions of work efficiency. 923 university students (94 males, 829 females; approximately 10% smokers) participated in the study. Univariate analyses showed that smokers were less conscientious, had lower positive wellbeing and lower attainment scores. Smokers also reported greater exposure to stressors, more negative coping and higher negative outcome scores. When established predictors of wellbeing (positive personality; social support; exposure to stressors and negative coping) and attainment (being conscientious) were co-varied, smoking still had a significant effect on academic attainment but not the wellbeing outcomes.

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