The Relationship Between Thyroid Hormones (Thyroxin, Triiodothyronine) and Metabolic Activities of Body: Reviewed

Journal of Health and Medical Sciences

ISSN 2622-7258

Published: 10 March 2020

The Relationship Between Thyroid Hormones (Thyroxin, Triiodothyronine) and Metabolic Activities of Body: Reviewed

Jamila Jafari

Bamyan University, Afghanistan

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10.31014/aior.1994.03.01.101

Pages: 84-89

Keywords: Hormone, Thyroxine, Triiodothyronine, Metabolism

Abstract

The thyroid gland is located in front of the neck, within the thyroid are small, spherical chambers called follicles. Cells line the walls of the follicles and produce thyroglobulin, the substance from which thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) are made. Thyroxine is usually produced in greater quantity than triiodothyronine, and most thyroxine is eventually converted to triiodothyronine. TH regulates the body's metabolic rate and production of heat. It also maintains blood pressure and promotes normal development and functioning of several organ systems. TH affects cellular metabolism by stimulating protein synthesis, the breakdown of lipids, and the use of glucose for production of ATP. Library Methodology used in this article is Library research, Directly and indirectly Researcher views are discussed. In addition; Research Instruments used in this research are: Fiche card, updated and authentic academic text-books, Journals and articles. answers were sought for the questions from various academic resources. Recent development in basic and clinical investigations has augmented our grasp of the information and science. This review discusses and recognition the thyroid hormones, meanwhile described its relationship with metabolic activities state and some orders.

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