Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute
Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Journal of Social and Political

Sciences

ISSN 2615-3718 (Online)

ISSN 2621-5675 (Print)

asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
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Published: 28 March 2022

Attributes of Working Children in the Philippines

Cristina Teresa N. Lim

De La Salle University, Philippines

journal of social and political sciences
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doi

10.31014/aior.1991.05.01.339

Pages: 106-116

Keywords: Child Labor, Poverty, Philippines

Abstract

It is the right of every child to have a healthy environment, formal education, and a loving family. However, poverty forces a child to work even in dangerous streets. In the Philippines, the Child Protection Law defined children as persons below eighteen (18) years of age or those over but are unable to fully take care of themselves or protect themselves from abuse, neglect, cruelty, exploitation, or discrimination because of a physical or mental disability or condition. Despite the existing legislations in the country and with the United Nations declarations promoting the protection of children from exploitation, the problem in the country continues to exist. The paper aims to determine the extent of child labor in the country and describe the conditions of their work. The analysis of this paper made use of statistical data from the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA). Descriptive methods of analysis were utilized in analyzing the data. The results of the study showed that the continued pauperization in the countryside, especially in the urban centers brought about by population growth and capitalism, had increased the number of children joining the labor force. Although progress has been made in promoting and protecting the rights of these children in national legislation and policy, many remain unreached, especially children among the poorest families, who contribute significantly to family income. This limited access of children to basic services further put them into the life of drudgery that would impair their development, hence, their future in general.

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