Engagement to Rivalry: American Relations With China Since the End of the Cold War

Journal of Social and Political

Sciences

ISSN 2615-3718 (Online)

ISSN 2621-5675 (Print)

Published: 14 November 2019

Engagement to Rivalry: American Relations With China Since the End of the Cold War

Mehmetali Kasim

Nigde Omar Halisdemir University, Turkey

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10.31014/aior.1991.02.04.129

Pages: 906-916

Keywords: America, China, Liberal World Order, Authoritarianism, International Relations

Abstract

American relations with China is one of the most important bilateral relations in the world today. It will continue to do so in the foreseeable future, which will, ultimately, affect the peace and prosperity of the globe. Rising China, with its authoritarian ambition to become the main global player, is considered a fundamental challenge to liberal world order and American leadership in the twenty-first century. This paper, using qualitative analysis, firstly explores the change of global balance of power and its developments after the end of the Cold War. Secondly, it investigates American foreign policy towards China and its implications for Chinese foreign policymaking. At the same time, it covers the economic development of both countries as well as their different approach towards global issues. Lastly, current trends of world economic-political systems, the emergence of liberal and authoritarian blocks which are representing two global superpowers, and its significance to future international relations, stability, and opulence of the world are scrutinized.

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