Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute
Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Journal of Social and Political

Sciences

ISSN 2615-3718 (Online)

ISSN 2621-5675 (Print)

asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
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Published: 24 June 2022

Reforming and Creating a Business-Friendly Environment: An Empirical Case Study of (Non-Profit Organization) in Nigeria

Ejiro U. Osiobe

Baker University, USA

journal of social and political sciences
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doi

10.31014/aior.1991.05.02.356

Pages: 164-192

Keywords: Business-Friendly Environment, Religion, Economic Impact, Bureaucratic Activities

Abstract

As a religious country, the people's faith has influenced business behavior and actions. Some residents view their religion as a culture, way of life, trust-currency, and/or a segregation index. Previous studies have analyzed and attributed corruption in Nigeria as the primary cause of the dwindling economy, attributing a direct and sometimes indirect correlation to the nation's focus on religion as the catalyst of the country's problem. This article is an internal whitepaper of the Ane Osiobe International Foundation's activities, utilizing its costs of operation and estimated budget for future projects to analyze the economic impact of corruption on the Nigerian economy's business-friendly environment, attraction, and retention. The impact results show the direct, indirect, and induced effects of a hostile business environment as non-profit organizations try to help residents of the Nigerian economy, and the government places a heavy tax burden on their donations under section 12-A of the Nigerian tax code and the indirect bureaucratic corrupted processes on every activity that can promote economic growth and development within the region; which is simply an indirect, self-induced economic war against the Nigerian people that in turn creates a vicious domino-and-multiplier effect against the nation in the international market. The recommendation from the study builds on the premise that the most valuable asset to combat this hostile virtuous cycle is trust and transparency not only at the national level but where it is most needed, which is the individual level.

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