Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute
Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Journal of Social and Political

Sciences

ISSN 2615-3718 (Online)

ISSN 2621-5675 (Print)

asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
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open access

Published: 05 April 2021

Situational Criminogenic: The Financial Crime’s Collaborative Factors in Indonesia

Supriyanto, Adrianus Meliala

University of Indonesia

journal of social and political sciences
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doi

10.31014/aior.1991.04.02.270

Pages: 1-9

Keywords: Situational Criminogenic, Financial Crime, Criminaloid, Organizational Criminogenic

Abstract

Financial crimes in Indonesia from 2014-2018 were classified as quite dynamic with a total of 241,367 cases. In 2018 the legal unit area of Polda Metro Jaya had the highest number of cases of 5,526 cases of financial crimes. This study seeks to examine the determinant aspects of financial crime in Indonesia. I used the illustration of the case of First Travel and the Koperasi Simpan Pinjam (KSP) Pandawa that occurred in Indonesia with a total loss of up to IDR 1 trillion. Discussions in this paper begin from the point of view of white collar crime that elaborated with criminaloid and organizational criminogenic aspects. This study uses a grounded theory method through in-depth interviews of actors. The result is that on the criminaloid aspect, the perpetrators have a tendency to easily confess, have certain social and cultural status, has moral sensitivity and intelligence, and has skills, but hesitates in acting. Meanwhile, in the organizational criminogenic aspect, it was found that the perpetrators were in an environment with profit-oriented ambitions, had certain business perceptions, had a loyal attitude towards their group and their human resources tended to be homogeneous. The results of this study found that a supportive situation is needed in financial crime based on the illustrations of the cases used. Situational criminogenic aspects in research in the form of business that utilize religious sentiments, use a cooperative system and manage funds with a Ponzi scheme. This research will enrich criminology studies, especially in the field of white collar crime. Other than that, hopefully can be useful in the formulation of policies for stakeholders.

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