Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute
Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Journal of Social and Political

Sciences

ISSN 2615-3718 (Online)

ISSN 2621-5675 (Print)

asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
asia insitute of research, journal of social and political sciences, jsp, aior, journal publication, humanities journal, social journa
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Published: 01 August 2022

Stigmatization of Former Corruption Convicts in Indonesian Parliament Elections

Manotar Tampubolon, Chontina Siahaan

Universitas Kristen Indonesia, Indonesia

journal of social and political sciences
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doi

10.31014/aior.1991.05.03.360

Pages: 22-30

Keywords: Former Convict of Corruption, Stigma, Political Freedoms, Stereotype

Abstract

This article examines the social stigma of defunct corruption convicted criminals in Indonesia's parliament elections using the stigma concept and human rights. This research is a socio-legal cogitate which disfigures the challenges of the electoral social stigma of peoples' political freedoms whenever one wants to pursue just after elections and be appointed through lawful means. Every Indonesian citizen may cast a ballot and be selected, which is granted and protected by the law. However, in most cases, such sheltered rights are limited once former prisoners from Indonesia run for positions in the council or legislature. The primary squeezing address is why the state should restrict prior devaluation of prisoners' capacity to run for parliamentary office whereas ensuring that each citizen's political rights are fully protected within the framework. The explanation for this may be that the national legislature is among the most fraudulent institutions in the country. Under the worst circumstance, former corruption convicts would be ostracized and will perpetuate a punishable offense after already being voted into power by a house of representatives. This paper proves the electoral demonization of a state as just a set of criteria for parliaments nominees.

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