Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute
Asian Institute of Research, Journal Publication, Journal Academics, Education Journal, Asian Institute

Education Quarterly Reviews

ISSN 2621-5799

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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Published: 25 January 2022

A Functional Analogy on Instructor-Learner Interaction and Reversible Work-Meaningful Learning

Ahmet Gürses, Elif Sahin, T. Barkın Barın, Kübra Güneş

Ataturk University, Turkey

asia institute of research, journal of education, education journal, education quarterly reviews, education publication, education call for papers
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doi

10.31014/aior.1993.05.01.419

Pages: 67-69

Keywords: Analogies, Rote learning, Constructivism, Learning theories, Thermodynamics

Abstract

Analogies can be powerful teaching tools because they can make new material intelligible to students by comparing it to material that is already familiar. In assisting students to understand chemistry concepts, teachers occasionally use analogies. These analogies are believed to help the students to structure the new knowledge and they are considered to be especially useful for topics of an abstract or submicroscopic nature. However, analogies have also been identified as a factor in the students' misunderstanding of chemical concepts. By a functional analogical approach constructed onto the two fundamental concepts (learning and the work in thermodynamics) in this study, the presentation of the similarities between the interactive nature of learning and the requirements enabling a mechanical change such as the reversible expansion is aimed.

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